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Save Your Stuff Blog

Archive for the ‘Protect and Save Personal Valuable Items in Office and at Home’ Category

Prevent and Remove Mold From Old Leather Belongings – 7 Useful Tips from a Preservation Expert

Tuesday, January 26th, 2016

By Natalie Miller, Guest Blogger

Mold can be found everywhere. Those microscopic furry organisms come in different forms and colours, and they can and do colonize anything – including your home, the contents and tragically, your treasured heirlooms. Mold can cause serious damage and it is particularly dangerous to old leather book bindings and other leather heirlooms. Here are 7 useful tips on preventing and cleaning mold from your old leather belongings… An important 1st Tip!: old leather is much weaker and more sensitive and you cannot clean it the same way or with the same products as new leather!

Leave stains along for now

Get good air circulation to dry out mold

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Family History Heirlooms, Fragility and a FREE Book

Friday, September 19th, 2014

By Emma Spellman, contributing bloggerEmma Spellman, Guest Blogger

Preserving Paper: The Fragility of Family History Memories can be very important. They are reminders of people, places and experiences that have meant a lot to us. We reminisce with old friends, tell stories about our past adventures, and treasure the photos, letters and other and documents that remind us or jog our memories of the people we used to know. However, memory is not just about what we remember for ourselves. We even treasure the memories that have beeLove lettern shared with us. We keep hold of photos of family members who died long before we were born, and we preserve mementos of our own parents and grandparents, passing them on to the next generation, so that the people we have loved will continue to be remembered long after we are gone. We want to hold on to the stories we have been told, and the tangible reminders of the people who matter. This is why we need to keep hold of these family mementos. An old letter or photo can link the generations together, tell the stories and ensure that the people who created them will be remembered. Learn the tips and “how-to” take care of them with a free 205 page book you can download. CLICK HERE

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Memorabilia Collection Care 5 important tips

Wednesday, November 6th, 2013

By Katherine Golovinova

sports-memorabilia

People collect memorabilia to treasure memories. Sports fans and movie lovers alike treasure such acquisitions and strive to keep the items in pristine condition. No one in their right mind would want to spend thousands of dollars on a ‘Honus Wagner’ baseball card and then let it decay due to lack of care and attention. This is where preservation, conservation, and restoration of memorabilia come in. First, let’s take a look at what each of these terms mean then I’ll give you some great tips to take care of your stuff.

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Consultation Services for Your Fine Arts

Friday, November 11th, 2011

A consultation service by a fine art conservator may include, art registry, Insurance evaluations emergency damage claims and restoration and conservation.
You may need of an appraisal for an insurance claim, insurance policy needs, estate planning, probate settlement or a collection of documentations. A fine art conservator can work with your insurance company.
When a disaster occurs and your property is damaged, without records, you may not be reimbursed for the value of your loss. If your house is destroyed, or just your artwork, there will be a major loss.
You should think about how to prepare for disaster, with the earthquake and fire and floods. It’s not if something will happen close to home, but when, and how terrible it will be. Art may be registered and described.


Art Registry is tracking identification system that is attached information that is applied to your art and collectibles, the archive safe ID tag are registered in a database.
The progress of any conservation or preservation previously done on a fine art needs to be recorded. This should include changes to the frame, so that all the information on an item may be traced. This information will insure that proper care is provided in handling your artwork.
If you decided not to take the correct steps to protect your paintings or collectables, the information about your art may be lost, if it is sold. If a paintings or collectable is sold, the registration is transferred with the Art register tag.

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Ripped Oil Painting Didn’t Need An Earthquake To Fall Off The Wall.

Monday, August 22nd, 2011

Last week, at the Laguna Arts Festival Lecture series (http://bit.ly/pVVE6C), I spoke as the visiting expert about how to protect and save collectibles, artwork etc. Some of the things we talked about included protecting and saving items from

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Dents, Cracks and Rips of Gorgeous Oil Painting by Robert Wood A Result of Poor Handling

Thursday, November 18th, 2010
Mistreated Breath Taking Work of Art.

Mistreated, Breath Taking Work of Art.

The following painting was brought into the lab because it had couple complications: It  contained several dents and tears towards the middle and in the lower right hand corner and it was also it was cracking badly.

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7 Quick, Inexpensive Steps – An Archival Method For Storing Photos, Letters and Certificates

Saturday, October 16th, 2010

Piles of photos and letters that need protection?

Piles of photos and letters that need protection?

Women’s World Magazine recently interviewed me for information on what can a busy woman do at home, on her own, really quickly, if she spills her morning ‘Joe’ or a glass of liquid on some photos. I mentioned about the process of writing the article a couple of times on my Facebook Page at “Save Your Stuff.”

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Trashed Russian Old Masterpiece Saved

Saturday, July 31st, 2010

This painting has a great story I’m sure you’ll find interesting, even in its abbreviated form:

Painted in 1903, a Russian artist from St. Petersburg sent this painting to America to be exhibited in 1904 at the St. Louis International Exhibition to celebrate the Louisiana Purchase. An art dealer gathered paintings from his country’s best artists to expose their artwork to American buyers but once the paintings were in the United States complications arose. The paintings were shown but the dealer refused to past the custom’s duties. So, after the expo, the paintings were held in limbo for a number of years until they were auctioned off, by Presidential decree. This painting ended up at the De Young Museum, then the Oakland Museum of Art and then to several high end collectors, until it landed unceremoniously buried in stuff in a warehouse sometime in the 1960’s we assume.

Recently, the painting was unceremoniously designated to be discarded until a sharp-eyed collector saved it from the dumpster. What probably happened was that after a small rip had been repaired poorly, then another, and another… finally, the damage and the dirty surface made it fit for “long term storage” where it was forgotten… until someone started to clear things out.

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Art Treasure Found In The Trash

Tuesday, July 27th, 2010

Consult Professional Conservation Services Before Getting Rid of Art

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The Challenge for Collectors: Knowing the Difference Between Real and Counterfeit Art

Monday, July 26th, 2010

Real versus Fake?

Distinguishing a genuine work of art from a counterfeit wannabe stands at the foundation of every collector’s turmoil. “Fakes” are not always an effort to deceive.  However, most “fakes” are fraudulent. Here are a few different scenarios to consider as a collector:

  • An artist’s estate can morally add an artist’s signature to a piece post mortem in an effort to identify the estate and the artist on artwork that was unsigned originally.
  • An unscrupulous art dealer can add a fake signature to make the artwork more valuable.  Even the signature of an unknown name can make the artwork more valuable than an unsigned painting.
  • A “new” painting can be antiqued to look old and more valuable.
  • An old painting can be “doctored” so heavily to mask or disguise repairs that it changes the essence of the artwork and makes the artwork no longer “original.”
  • Old artwork, now dirty, can be mistaken for something it is not.  This can be an honest mistake by a collector or dealer.

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